THE SILENT DUCHESS by Anne Green

THE SILENT DUCHESS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Although listed as fiction, these memoirs of the Duchess de la Roche-Ferte make a dead-set for biography, and a biography of a century rather than of an individual. The recital covers a seventy year span of the reigns of Louis XV and XVI, through the French Revolution, and the social, intellectual and political life of these periods is conveyed with almost overwhelming detail. There is none of the fantasy, the eccentricity associated with Anne Green. This is straight period portraiture, with scarcely any narrative. After a convent schooling, the Duchess came out into the world at fourteen, made an estimable but loveless marriage, and devoted herself thereafter to court life, to salon life, and to occasional intrigue. Finally at seventy she lived through the four years of revolution, and refusing to escape Paris, became one of its victims. Rather fascinating as a fulsome study of the period, with royalty, intellectuals, peopling its pages. But limited in appeal

Pub Date: Oct. 20th, 1939
Publisher: Harper