THE PRISONER OF PINEAPPLE PLACE by Anne Lindbergh

THE PRISONER OF PINEAPPLE PLACE

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

A return to The People of Pineapple Place (1982), an invisible street that has been moving from place to place for 50 years, its inhabitants caught at their 1930's age. Jeremiah, nine, is restive--he has now been through fourth grade 50 times, studying Greece each time, and Mr. Sweeny has not kept his promise of enlivening the subject by taking the street to the real Greece. Instead, it is now in Athens, Connecticut, where people are so conscientious about recycling that Pineapple Place has a problem with ""trash flow""; there just aren't enough discards to sustain them, and they boggle at stealing. Yearning for something new, Jeremiah contrives to be seen, makes a friend, even visits sixth grade in a 1980's school--and precipitates some real change at last. Lindbergh's characters are amusingly well drawn, her story engaginly told. As long as her people are confined by her original premise that change is impossible, the logic is entertainingly developed; ironically, though, Jeremiah's success breaks that logic's bounds and weakens the story's conclusion.

Pub Date: May 10th, 1988
Page count: 178pp
Publisher: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich