Skeptics will raise their eyebrows, but open-minded parents will find encouragement in Evans’ story.

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BEATING AUTISM

HOW ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE CURED MY CHILD

A mother turns to Chinese medicine and alternative therapies to heal her autistic child.

Evans’ daughter, Sarah, was a bright, happy child until the age of 4, when she began exhibiting some unusual symptoms, including an awkward gait, repetitive speech patterns, and trouble socializing with other children. Her behavioral issues were compounded by disturbing physical symptoms, including food sensitivities, hives, vomiting, and bug bites that refused to heal. Trips to numerous doctors yielded no clear answers. The official diagnosis from her pediatrician was “delayed development,” although Evans recounts that “he told me in words that she was autistic.” Desperate for answers, the author embarked on a quest to cure her child. Eventually, a friend’s recommendation led her to Dr. Ross J. Stark, who practiced traditional Chinese medicine as well as an unusual alternative therapy called Nambudripad’s Allergy Elimination Technique, developed by a chiropractor and acupuncturist named Devi Nambudripad in the 1980s. Once Sarah began the NAET treatments, Evans writes, her condition improved dramatically. The child’s visits to Dr. Stark, coupled with dietary changes, seemed to reduce her dyslexia symptoms, improve her ability to focus, and enhance her coordination. The author tells of her daughter’s therapy in exhaustive detail, explaining the meticulous process of clearing Sarah’s body of the “blockages in her system that did not allow various nutrients to flow freely.” Although Evans had already removed many problematic foods from Sarah’s diet months earlier, she says, “they would still be present in her system since the body carries a memory of everything that passes through it”; the alternative therapies, she notes, recalibrated Sarah’s digestive system and eventually allowed her to return some offending foods to her diet. Evans’ account of her daughter’s transformation is certainly inspiring. However, the treatments she describes sometimes sound far-fetched, and the book stumbles when it points to discredited research by Dr. Andrew Wakefield to support Evans’ contention that childhood vaccines may be connected to her daughter’s condition. Nonetheless, the author’s commitment to doing whatever it took to ease her daughter’s symptoms will appeal to other parents looking for solutions to their own children’s health problems.

Skeptics will raise their eyebrows, but open-minded parents will find encouragement in Evans’ story.

Pub Date: June 15, 2015

ISBN: 978-0-692-37465-8

Page Count: 245

Publisher: West River Publishing

Review Posted Online: June 1, 2015

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

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