TIMOTHY TODD'S GOOD THINGS ARE GONE by Anne Rockwell

TIMOTHY TODD'S GOOD THINGS ARE GONE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Timothy Todd, the peddler who sold Farmer Foote a Gollywhopper Egg, engages in a less imaginative transaction when he takes shelter in a little old house and wakes up to find that his pack has disappeared. The culprit is not the bobcat, crow, or bear, as first seems likely, but an old man who owns the house; however, Timothy Todd proposes a game--""let's pretend your house is a hotel""--and the old man soon agrees to settle for just a few items from the pack as payment for the shelter. But a glimpse of the goods has proved seductive, for before the peddler leaves, the old hermit is offering bed and board in exchange for shirt fabric next time through. Without any clever rascality, it just comes down to business as usual.

Pub Date: Sept. 18th, 1978
Publisher: Macmillan (Ready-to-Read)