POT FULL OF LUCK by Anne Rose

POT FULL OF LUCK

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A mildly amusing, mildly thought-tickling story, based on Ashanti folklore, about a wise man named Mumba who gets tired of giving out advice and answers and so decides to store away his wisdom and get some rest. He orders his wife to make a large tight clay pot, and when she does he stashes his wits deep inside it. But then he handles the pot in such a noodle-headed way that it finally drops and breaks, scattering bits of wisdom ""every which way."" ""Hee-hee,"" laugh Mumba's family and neighbors, ""You lost your sense when you stuffed it in the pot and stopped using it!"" And Mumba, angry at first, finally joins in. This last exchange may weaken the impact of the tale, which could have ended with the shattering and let the bits of wisdom fall where they would. But the ending is in tune with Tomes' human-interest illustrations, which give an African guise and an African setting to her familiar, fetching little figures with their caught-on-the-run remarks. As for Mumbo, he's introduced as a tall, straight, dignified figure with lines on his face, then put through his foolish or mock-dignified paces as cued by the story.

Pub Date: Aug. 16th, 1982
Publisher: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard