CAMERON'S LANDING by Anne Stuart

CAMERON'S LANDING

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The author is gothically adept: the manse (in 1880s Maine), crotchety matriarch, mixed bag of adult family members (there'll be one with a few loose shingles), intermittent intemperate weather, walks in the night, and the young companion governess--here, pleasantly, Lorna, who is nearly six feet tall, slightly myopic (in more ways than one), and equipped with a billy goat's appetite for food. Someone in the family, confides the matriarch, has done away with her husband Josiah, and it will be Lorna's unofficial chore to snoop around. Throughout, Lorna is WARNED by everyone, including the man she will marry, and then come that obligatory blow on the staircase, three more murders, clues haphazardly gathered, and the final nick-of-time rescue from the murderer who has just blabbed all. Lorna is agreeable company, and at least she doesn't waste time pulsating and cowering as do most of her peers--she'll whisk you through the silly but civil doings.

Pub Date: July 1st, 1977
Publisher: Doubleday