A guide to the fundamental principles of building and maintaining personal wealth, relying more on the author’s instinct...

The Most Important Lessons in Economics and Finance

A COMPREHENSIVE COLLECTION OF TIME-TESTED PRINCIPLES OF WEALTH MANAGEMENT

Criniti (The Necessity of Finance, 2013) interprets the key concepts underlying economic and financial behavior, with an emphasis on personal finance.

Criniti makes frequent references to his previous book as he guides the reader through 218 principles of economics and finance that he finds to be both essential and universally applicable. His claim that “around the 1950s it became formally necessary to create finance, the science of managing wealth for an individual, a group, or an organization” may raise the eyebrows of readers familiar with a longer span of history, but it does allow readers to understand what exactly the author means by “finance.”Most of the principles identified in the book relate to matters of personal finance—spending, saving, retirement—and business operations. Some of the principles Criniti explores are reasonable if somewhat simplistic guidelines: “Always keeping your promises can help you to keep your good reputation.” and “Only give gifts that you can afford to give.” Others require greater leaps of logic or adherence to a profit-driven worldview: “Economic cycles are naturally required wealth adjustments by economic entities.”; “Some people will do anything to deprive you of your wealth.” Some principles merit two pages of explanation, while others are dispatched in a paragraph or two; the explanations are derived more from the author’s understanding of his principles than from empirical evidence or analysis. The principle that “Wealth is attracted to cities,” for instance, is supported by no data, merely the claim that “In general, you will find your greatest opportunities to build wealth in cities versus suburbia or the country.” Although the title suggests an introductory economics course, the readers who will find the greatest value here are those in search of a more philosophical companion for their personal finance handbooks.

A guide to the fundamental principles of building and maintaining personal wealth, relying more on the author’s instinct than on quantitative data.

Pub Date: Jan. 11, 2014

ISBN: 978-0988459526

Page Count: 288

Publisher: Criniti Publishing

Review Posted Online: March 27, 2014

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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WHAT A WONDERFUL WORLD

A LIFETIME OF RECORDINGS

Noted jazz and pop record producer Thiele offers a chatty autobiography. Aided by record-business colleague Golden, Thiele traces his career from his start as a ``pubescent, novice jazz record producer'' in the 1940s through the '50s, when he headed Coral, Dot, and Roulette Records, and the '60s, when he worked for ABC and ran the famous Impulse! jazz label. At Coral, Thiele championed the work of ``hillbilly'' singer Buddy Holly, although the only sessions he produced with Holly were marred by saccharine strings. The producer specialized in more mainstream popsters like the irrepressibly perky Teresa Brewer (who later became his fourth wife) and the bubble-machine muzak-meister Lawrence Welk. At Dot, Thiele was instrumental in recording Jack Kerouac's famous beat- generation ramblings to jazz accompaniment (recordings that Dot's president found ``pornographic''), while also overseeing a steady stream of pop hits. He then moved to the Mafia-controlled Roulette label, where he observed the ``silk-suited, pinky-ringed'' entourage who frequented the label's offices. Incredibly, however, Thiele remembers the famously hard-nosed Morris Levy, who ran the label and was eventually convicted of extortion, as ``one of the kindest, most warm-hearted, and classiest music men I have ever known.'' At ABC/Impulse!, Thiele oversaw the classic recordings of John Coltrane, although he is the first to admit that Coltrane essentially produced his own sessions. Like many producers of the day, Thiele participated in the ownership of publishing rights to some of the songs he recorded; he makes no apology for this practice, which he calls ``entirely appropriate and without any ethical conflicts.'' A pleasant, if not exactly riveting, memoir that will be of most interest to those with a thirst for cocktail-hour stories of the record biz. (25 halftones, not seen)

Pub Date: May 1, 1995

ISBN: 0-19-508629-4

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Oxford Univ.

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1995

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