FOR THE GOOD OF THE STATE by Anthony Price

FOR THE GOOD OF THE STATE

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

More espionage convolutions featuring Dr. David Audley of British Intelligence's R&D department--who, as usual, has just as much to fear from his ever-feuding compatriots as from the KGB. This new tangle begins when old-pro Audley receives a visit from young UK agent Sir Thomas Arkenshaw, who is supposed to arrange a meeting between Audley and veteran KGB spymaster Nikolai Panin (who wants to make some sort of unspecified deal). Reasonable enough. But why does a sniper take Shots at Dr. Audley? And why has Audley's ancient expert on Panin recently died under suspicious circumstances? And what are the real motives of Arkenshaw's boss Henry Jaggard (who'd like to sabotage Audley's department)? Once Panin and Audley meet on a desolate moor, things becomes slightly clearer: Panin needs UK help in neutralizing (without too much violence) some England-based Polish nationalists, bent on anti. KGB revenge for past atrocities. But more complications (including a CIA femme fatale in Arkenshaw's bed) soon surface, of course, resulting in sporadic shoot-outs on the moors--and a long sorting-out of crisscrossing motives at the close. Price finds offbeat charm in the edgy, affectionate relationship between savvy oldster Audley and confused young Sir Thomas (who's the half-Polish son of Audley's old flame). Otherwise, however, despite spurts of chase and violence, this is talky, static spy murk--without the highly fanciful turns that some loyal Price followers may expect.

Pub Date: June 1st, 1987
Publisher: Mysterious Press--dist. by Ballantine