AT THE ORIGINS OF THE THOMISTIC NOTION OF MAN by Anton C. Pegis

AT THE ORIGINS OF THE THOMISTIC NOTION OF MAN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

An exercise in explaining the origin of the Thomistic doctrine of man, this may be of some academic interest -- particularly because of the authorship - - but it is hardly more than that. A slim volume, it appears to be little more than an ""on paper"" version of perhaps two or more lectures. Students would be committed to studying what Dr. Pegis says but it would have to be in the broader context of the full study of man. Elaborating on the Augustinianism of St. Thomas while showing the differences between the Platonism of Augustine and the Aristotelianism of St. Thomas, the author attempts to answer the true Thomistic question: What kind of being is man?.... What kind of internal unity does he have as a composite of spirit and matter living within a spiritual existence? The appendices include texts from Nemesius, Plotinus, Plato and Aristotle. Dr. Pegis (usually a Bruce author) has been added -- at least for this book -- to the Macmillan stable of authors.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1963
Publisher: Macmillan