CHRISTIAN PHILOSOPHY AND INTELLECTUAL FREEDOM by Anton C. Pegis

CHRISTIAN PHILOSOPHY AND INTELLECTUAL FREEDOM

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This volume contains the revised and expended version of the 1955 Gabriel Richard Lecture delivered by a well known and highly respected thomistic scholar. Leaning heavily on the historical opinions and philosophical views of Etienne Gilson, the author succinctly discusses the problem of the apparent contradiction involved in the phrase, ""Christian philosophy"", resolves the paradox in a way contrary to the customary understanding of most Catholic and non-Catholic philosophers alike, and presents a telling plea against the separation of philosophy and faith in the mind of the Christian philosopher and the educational pattern of the Catholic school. He sees the intellect most free, and philosophy most true to itself, when they are open, and not neutral, to revelation. He sees the Catholic philosopher's vocation as not so much a matter of debating with other philosophers as a matter of being creative within the framework of the Christian inspiration that historically gave rise to the sound metaphysical structure of St. Thomas's philosophy. He warns against confusing the distinction and autonomy of philosophy with separation from faith. Timely, stimulating and provocative, this essay will appeal mainly to students and professors of philosophy in Catholic colleges and universities.

Publisher: Bruce