THE LOST TRAVELLER by Antonia White

THE LOST TRAVELLER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This concerns an egocentric young lady named Clara Batchelor who- rather dully-breaks in and out of adolescence and love in England around the year 1914. This novel, and a very typical novel it is, is Clara's search for inner peace- both in religion and in her family group. Unfortunately, Clara is in love with her father (although the author is not too aware of this) which complicates her progress. A convent, trips home in the interim, a Protestant school, an incestuous night at the opera with Papa, friendships, trips to the family farm, one kiss in an orchard, contempt for her mother- these are the patterns of Clara's life. Aimless and uncertain after school, she is offered a job as governess in a Catholic home. With her charge, a child named Charles, Clara does some fancy regressing. While playing a game one day, Charles leaps from a wall and is instantly killed. Clara blames herself, and rightly so, and through this traumatic experience there is just the barest possibility that Clara may emerge a more integrated personality.... Clara is obnoxious, her father is the scholar, her mother is the sofa, novel-reading, window gazing female, her two aunts are delightful, her friend Nicole is enchanting. There is too much concentration on Clara however and not enough on the others who have possibilities.

Publisher: Viking