THE TREASURE OF THE MULETEER: And Other Spanish Tales by Antonio Jimenez-Landi

THE TREASURE OF THE MULETEER: And Other Spanish Tales

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KIRKUS REVIEW

These austere Spanish tales illustrate some interesting aspects of the Christian-Moorish struggle and the diversity of Iberian regional characters, but their appeal will not extend to the usual folk and fairy tale audience. Despite the eminence of collector Jimenez-Landi and of poet/translator Blackburn, the style is wordy and awkward, the translation seemingly literal to the point of sacrificing fluency and pace. In any case, the tales incorporate only the most obvious folklore themes: ""The Treasure of the Muleteer"" is another crude demonstration of the evil done by gossipy, meddling wives; the ""Xana of Spring"" tells how a virtuous maiden turned the soldiers who pursued her into a flock of sheep. Most of the legends date back to the expulsion of the Moors and are religiously inspired celebrations of Christian heroes such as Voto and Fernan Gonzalez, though the last entry tells how a family of clandestine Moslems take revenge on a suitor who betrayed one of their members to the Inquisition. Primarily for students of Spanish history and culture.

Pub Date: March 1st, 1974
Publisher: Doubleday