GOOD MORNING, YOUNG LADY by Ardyth Kennelly

GOOD MORNING, YOUNG LADY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Dorney Leaf at 15 lived chiefly in a dream world, for the real world of her waking hours was pretty drab. Motherless, unwanted, she was shunted from one member of the family to another, and when our story gets under way, she is living with the sister who had little use for her, and trying to get over her disappointment in the unfriendliness of her sister's daughter, Crystal, and the shock of finding that the other daughter, Jetta, is subnormal. Salt Lake City seems big and unforbidding- and only in the illusions she sustains about ""the Queen"", her employer, Mrs. Morelewski, and her dream hero, the bandit, Butch Cassidy, does life have any color. Butch had taken his place in her imagination through stories told of him by her old friend and neighbor in Wyoming; she never dreamed she'd meet him in the flesh, or that he would actually fall in love with her. But meantime there had been Mr. Morelewski's professor nephew, and the books he loaned her which opened new horizons, and her meeting with Butch, while it seemed a dream fulfillment, had elements of unreality, confusion. The climax- the seeming desertion- leaves Dorney ready, alone and waiting, her dreams gone, only the reality of Teige Desmond left.... Sub plots break the pattern of the main story, slow its action. A book that falls between Peaceable Kingdom and The Spur in quality and appeal.

Pub Date: April 16th, 1953
Publisher: Houghton, Mifflin