EAT OF ME, I AM THE SAVIOR by Arnold Kemp

EAT OF ME, I AM THE SAVIOR

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Somewhere between satire and seriousness exists this ""Greatest Story Ever Told"" -- as seen from a macho black point of view -- full of martyrdom and saviorhood and honky hate plus an interesting confusion of Christian and Muslim traditions. Released after seven years in prison for killing the assassins (and assorted others unlucky enough to get in his way) of his Malcolm-X-like leader, Yaquii Laster, heir-apparent of the Revolution, returns to both literally and figuratively take his ""Master's"" place. It almost works, but betrayal from without (cops in specific, whites in general) and within (disputing revolutionaries in general, the Master's daughter in specific) shows Yaquii there's only one way out of this unbearably ugly world. So a significant three days after leaving prison (death) Yaquii ascends to a black heaven, replete with Master and disciples and a lot of trashy symbolism. The action moves right along from brutality to sex to rhetoric with a crude energy that partially compensates for the silliness of the plot.

Pub Date: May 23rd, 1972
Publisher: Morrow