SCHOOLS OF TOMORROW- TODAY! by Arthur D. Morse

SCHOOLS OF TOMORROW- TODAY!

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Faces with the ""unprecedented problems of quantity and quality"", and the resultant loss of intellectual potential, schools, all over the country, are instituting new educational procedures to meet the emergency. The New York State Education Department (with a Ford Foundation grant) has examined experiments all over the country, and the most interesting of these have been reported here. In Lexington, Mass., the Franklin School has instituted team teaching at the elementary level; in Appleton, Wisc., there is an ungraded elementary school with a continuous progress plan; in New York City, a Demonstration Guidance Project has made possible the selection and special education of Negro and Puerto Rican students from an underprivileged area; in Bay City, Mich., there is a teacher aide program; Washington County, Maryland, makes important use of television, as does the Southwestern Indiana Education Television Council where science and languages are taught to 23,000 in 108 schools; a highly enriched program (Evanston, Ill., and Golden, Colo.,) has resulted in a remarkable achievement record; in an upstate (Catskill) rural New York area, there is a shared program of seminars, correspondence courses, and ""circuit"" teachers; and finally at Harvard, there is a program to recruit more teachers and provide incentive and stimulus. All of these plans have proved practicable and beneficial- and a report such as this should help to alert interest and prompt remedial action.

Pub Date: June 17th, 1960
Publisher: Doubleday