THE FAITH OF THE ATHEIST by Arthur Gibson

THE FAITH OF THE ATHEIST

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The purpose of this book is to establish, from the standpoint of the ""believer,"" what valid insights into reality have been offered by atheists, and to determine whether such insights are peculiar to atheism. Its thesis, in the order of intention, is that such insights do exist, that they are indeed peculiar to atheism, and that, therefore, since atheism has content of value for theism, there exists a common ground on which the two schools can meet. The author pursues this thesis through those areas in which that community of interest seems to lie: freedom, power, sex, death, matter, etc.: in so doing, he does indeed make a case to the effect that (Christian) faith can learn much from (Communist) atheism. But he fails to discover -- and this is the weak point of the book -- how the latter might benefit from an exchange with the former; in other words, he establishes a basis, not for a profitable dialogue, but for an act of charity on the part of institutionalized athcism. As an appeal, then, to atheism for a certain cooperation in necessarlis, the book has some value; but as the basis for a bilateral contribution, it leaves much to be desired -- one half, to be precise.

Pub Date: Oct. 9th, 1968
Publisher: Harper & Row