FROM THE DISTRICT ATTORNEY'S OFFICE by Arthur Train

FROM THE DISTRICT ATTORNEY'S OFFICE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The Prisoner at the Bar rewritten, after 34 years of popularity in law schools, and combined with material from On the Trail of the Bad Man, Courts, Criminals and the Camorra, True Stories of Crime. Here, for the layman, are the responsibilities and functions of the District Attorney, the Police Court, the Grand Jury, the Judge, the Witness, and the process of law in criminal cases, the trial of felonies, tricks of astute and unscrupulous criminal lawyers, law delays and red tape, women in the courts and as witnesses, complainants and defendants and jurors, animals in court, foolish laws, marriage and divorce, insanity and the law, detectives -- and the social philosophy of crime and criminals. Studious reflections on the administration of criminal justice, plus actual cases, reminiscences, and anecdotes. Those who take their citizenship seriously will be interested in the author's comment, ""an astonishing aspect of (t)his task of revision was to find that so little change has occurred over a third of a century in the conditions surrounding the administration of criminal justice in New York City and that, save in the Magistrates Courts, but few significant reforms had been achieved either in practice or procedure."" It is good reading for anyone, interesting in its application to John Q Public.

Pub Date: Aug. 14th, 1939
Publisher: Scribner