IS THE LAST SUPPER FINISHED? by Arthur Vogel

IS THE LAST SUPPER FINISHED?

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KIRKUS REVIEW

For some Catholics as well as for many Protestants, the Last Supper--i.e., the Holy Eucharist or Holy Communion--is finished. It is irrelevant, anachronistic, a hardy myth. For the great majority of Catholics, however, the Eucharist must remain, they feel instinctively, the center of their spiritual lives. The author of this book explains why that instinct is correct. The Eucharist is not, he explains, merely a symbol; it is a reality which enables the Christian to participate in a very real way in the life of the human community; it is a giving of oneself to humanity as well as a receiving of Christ. Catholics (and Protestants) who agree with the author's position will find his argumentation cogent and, indeed, definitive. Those who hold other views will find this material superficial, ""preachy,"" and full of slightly out-of-focus and non-analogous anecdotes and illustrations redolent of that old-time religion. The truth probably lies somewhere between. The author's arguments, however, for all his tendency to digress, are basically tightly woven and logical. But one feels that his initial premise is that of faith rather than of reason--and thus his ratiocinations become that betenoir of the Schoolmen, a petition of principles.

Pub Date: Aug. 21st, 1968
Publisher: Sheed & Ward