THE TROUBLE WITH CINDERELLA by Artie Shaw

THE TROUBLE WITH CINDERELLA

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KIRKUS REVIEW

All the kinks that changed Art Arshawsky to Art Shaw, to Artie Shaw the band rader whose musical talent was overshadowed by his temperament and his many wives, are ere explored in an intimate inventory that will not give the tabloid readers the sensational exposures they might expect. For this is a case history, of a boy ashamed of his wish background, whose drive and energy led to accomplishments that did not satisfy him, hit the tops with his dance bands, his string combinations, his recordings and who urned his back on all that for a farm, for writing, for the academic life, for Mexico, or an answered somewhere. It's the long hard, drab road to success -- from his early playing to learning to read music, working with one orchestra after another, meeting other musicians and finding classical music, often despising the audiences he played to and ware that his ignorance of his true goals was wrecking his life. A stint in the Navy and concentrated study of Freud began to unwind the tangle. Not the usual jazz history at an honest self searching, this odyssey of a meteor has little of the cocky, loud- Broadway chatter that might be expected and instead reflects the inner development of ""Little man, where are you going."" Sort of a collector's item, at that.

Pub Date: May 23rd, 1952
Publisher: Farrar, Straus & Young