THERE'S NO PLACE LIKE NOME by Artis Palmer

THERE'S NO PLACE LIKE NOME

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Living in Nome in the 1930's was living in a town thirty years too late for its heyday, but it was fun. Fresh from Seattle, where a still named Rose had provided the funds to pay back all the folks the Palmers owed when the Depression killed their building business, Jack Palmer gave his wife and daughter the come-ahead signal as follows: ""You be on last boat stop have house ready stop bring food for next eight months stop Jack"". In Nome awaited an assortment of cold country characters: the sweet and wonderful Eskimo family, the Aloruks; the vicious ""do-good"" minister's wife, whose best works always required foiling for the sake of their intended victims of mercy; Big Tom, a half-breed who might be polite when sober, but turned bad with drink; the Russian Count Jack worked for on an ever-decreasing gold vein, and the old miner the Count had to buy out before dredging his claim. A try at teaching a pampered husky pup to mush, a Santa Claus sporting wild reindeer for a team, a walrus hunt, and finally a fire which brought Papa his chance to do the work he was trained for at last are part and parcel of the undra panorama. A pleasant enough reader's excursion to the outlands.

Pub Date: April 3rd, 1963
Publisher: Morrow