THE MAN MISS SUSIE LOVED by Augusta Tucker

THE MAN MISS SUSIE LOVED

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Your customers who liked Viss Susie Siagle for its warm humanness will like this; those who were interested in it primarily for its inside picture of medicine, will find this less concerned with terminology and practice and medical ethics, and more important historically in its story of how ""Johns Hopkins"" came into being. For in this book the author turns back the leaves to Miss Susie as a young girl, falling hopelessly in love ""for all of her life"" with Chris Beverly; to their separation, his return determined to take her back to London with him, and his death, victim of the very inadequacies of medical and surgical knowledge which he had sought to obviate. From that moment, her life was tied to the building of the great hospital which was to bear the name of its donor, and -- against the background of old Baltimore -- you see the real Johns Hopkins, as he was understood and loved by the girl, Miss Susie. The book has more of plot and story than Viss Susie Slagle; the author has gained something in craftsmanship, but still has much to learn. But -- as in the other book -- she has a human quality that makes up for many shortcomings. And I liked the book.

Pub Date: Oct. 30th, 1942
Publisher: Harper