ARGENTINA, PARAGUAY, URUGUAY by Axel Homos

ARGENTINA, PARAGUAY, URUGUAY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

These are rather diluted characterizations, much fuller on Argentina than on Paraguay and Uruguay. The shared aspects -- religion and language -- are mentioned, the historical convergences -- efforts against Spain and Brazil -- are covered summarily. With almost 75% on Argentina alone, the other sections are necessarily skimpy. The facts on Paraguay, for example, are virtually restricted to historical outline basics (de Francia, the Lopez father and son, Stroessner; bilingualism; the east-west division; the landlocked limitations) and a few cultural observations but there is nothing on, say, the intimacy of church and state. The short text on Uruguay contains the same sort of information: the range of welfare benefits; the sheep and wool industry; Artigas, the 33 patriots, Ordonez; soccer as a national passion. The large part on Argentina covers historical and economic factors more extensively but without particular perception. (Further-more, Patagonia is referred to as a ""country."") There are also quotations from students and (for Paraguay) from Peace Corps volunteers. The Argentina section is more mature in focus than Hall's Land and People of Argentina but not as selective in coverage, and the Paraguay and uruguay chapters are slighter than Pendle's The Lands and Peoples of Paraguay and Uruguay and no improvement on the encyclopedia.

Pub Date: July 1st, 1969
Publisher: Nelson