THE TWELFTH JUROR by B. M. Gill

THE TWELFTH JUROR

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

The defendant is TV personality Edward Carne, on trial for murdering wife Jocelyn. The twelfth juror is Robert Quinn, 38, an ex-journalist who now runs ""a squat"" for four young London buskers. And the much-belabored secret coincidence in this earnest psycho-mystery is that Quinn is harboring Carne's crazed, alcoholic teenage daughter Frances at his commune-type building. Why doesn't Quinn disqualify himself and reveal Frances' whereabouts to the authorities? The reasons aren't convincing. Nonetheless, the trial goes forward--with plodding courtroom dramatics about means, opportunity, and motive. (Carne had at least one mistress; his wife may also have been unfaithful.) Meanwhile, Gill offers glimpses of the other eleven jurors and their psychological motivations. And finally Quinn must try to push the jury to a non-guilty verdict--because he has information from Frances (about her mother's lesbian affair) that the rest of the jury doesn't have. With, like Gill's previous efforts (Death Drop, Suspect) a heavy-handed psycho-sexual windup: slow, contrived going, more reminiscent of lesser John Wainwright than Twelve Angry Men.

Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 1984
Publisher: Scribners