CUNNINGHAM'S ROOSTER by Barbara Brenner
Kirkus Star

CUNNINGHAM'S ROOSTER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

What good is a song if there's no one to hear it?"" asks Cunningham, a cat who makes music but lives all alone except for his goldfish. (""And everyone knows that a goldfish has no ear for music."") Then an appreciative rooster named Kenneth comes to live with him and Cunningham, inspired, writes his best work yet -- a light, happy Rooster Rhapsody. The cat's grief when his friend appears to have been carried off by an opossum leads him to compose a slow, sad movement for the rhapsody, but later the errant Kenneth returns unharmed and a mellow, golden finale is added. The composition ends with Kenneth's proud, joyous crow as all the animals in the forest come to hear Cunningham play it on the piano. We can only add that both Brenner -- who gives us one possible view of creativity, an enticing picture of friendship and a charming glimpse of two individuals -- and Rockwell, who affects a droll sort of composure that is right in tune, have something to crow about too.

Pub Date: March 1st, 1975
Publisher: Parents' Magazine Press