AFRICA IS THUNDER AND WONDER by Barbara -- Ed. Nolen

AFRICA IS THUNDER AND WONDER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The thrust of this collection is to introduce Africa and make an incidental (and somewhat hedged) bid for cultural certification of sorts, both on a rather elementary level. The direction-setting first section consists of poems implicitly addressed to Countee Cullen's question ""What is Africa to me""; and further groupings of stories around village life, the supernatural, urbanization, and ""the African personality"" reflect segmented aspects of African experience, but tend to obscure the confluence of such motifs and sources in significant literary developments. An introduction by the former U.N. ambassador from Sierra Leone, Abioseh Nicol -- himself an avocational poet included here with other government figures -- ironically perpetuates the customary obstacles to genuine appreciation of African writing with such assertions as, ""The mastery of European languages. . . is another evidence of [Africans'] adaptability to world scholarship and literature"" and ""exotic qualities give African literature a flavor which is both attractive and educative."" But the tribal tales and works by the likes of Soyinka, Tutuola, Mphahlele and Achebe which appear here speak for themselves.

Pub Date: May 1st, 1972
Publisher: Scribners