ALLIGATORS, RACCONS, AND OTHER SURVIVORS: The Wildlife of the Future by Barbara Ford
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ALLIGATORS, RACCONS, AND OTHER SURVIVORS: The Wildlife of the Future

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Despite the demise of many species since Europeans landed in North America, some are doing better than they were when the first colonists arrived. Ford discusses several, such as the alligator and whitetail deer, who were once endangered by hunting but have made a comeback aided by state and federal laws; several others, such as the coyote and raccoon, who have adapted well to human environments; and a third group, including the mountain goat and snowy owl, whose habitats put them out of reach of human interference. Theories and practices of wildlife management are woven into the reports on particular species, and in all cases Ford asks questions (for example, why particular animals survive when close relatives haven't), notes exceptions (because of over-hunting, raccoons may soon need protection in the South), and relates the fates of the different species to qualities and conditions that make for survival. Thoughtful, readable, and with built-in aids to thoughtful reading.

Pub Date: April 8th, 1981
Publisher: Morrow