A moving memoir about familial strength when faced with the unthinkable.

HIDDEN IN THE VALLEY

Moore’s debut memoir is an emotionally wrought account of her mother’s mysterious disappearance in the woods in 2007.

Moore heard from her sister Cheryl that their parents’ hunting trip in Oregon’s Wallowa Mountains ended badly—their mother was missing. Moore’s aging parents, Doris and Harold Anderson, had their share of heartache; they suffered from both emotional and physical ailments. Doris, who lost a child and a brother, lived a life of fear. Harold had his own brush with death, which left his body vulnerable and weak. He insisted on an adventure hunting for elk, certain that his wife would benefit from the mountain air. Within only moments of arriving at the mountain trail, however, problems arose. As he tried to load his ATV, Harold badly injured himself, which left him disoriented. Their truck was soon stuck on an unpaved path, and the two started walking to find assistance. Weak with exhaustion, Doris stayed back as Harold continued down the road looking for help, but Harold lost consciousness atop a log. Though Harold was found by a hunting party, when he returned to the truck, Doris was gone. Harold quickly sought assistance and was aided by search and rescue coordinator Chris Galiszewski. The family was panic stricken over Doris’ absence. For 14 days, they fretted during the search, as Doris barely survived her ordeal in the woods. Told simply and candidly, this ordinary family’s story of faith and survival has weight. Moore’s narrative brims with love and spiritual focus as she highlights the moments that she believes God stepped in to save her mother. Her family’s ordeal will stay with the reader.

A moving memoir about familial strength when faced with the unthinkable.

Pub Date: Jan. 10, 2014

ISBN: 978-1490817057

Page Count: 142

Publisher: Westbow Press

Review Posted Online: Nov. 11, 2014

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A handful of pearls amid a pile of empty oyster shells.

THE COMFORT BOOK

Bestselling author Haig offers a book’s worth of apothegms to serve as guides to issues ranging from disquietude to self-acceptance.

Like many collections of this sort—terse snippets of advice, from the everyday to the cosmic—some parts will hit home with surprising insight, some will feel like old hat, and others will come across as disposable or incomprehensible. Years ago, Haig experienced an extended period of suicidal depression, so he comes at many of these topics—pain, hope, self-worth, contentment—from a hard-won perspective. This makes some of the material worthy of a second look, even when it feels runic or contrary to experience. The author’s words are instigations, hopeful first steps toward illumination. Most chapters are only a few sentences long, the longest running for three pages. Much is left unsaid and left up to readers to dissect. On being lost, Haig recounts an episode with his father when they got turned around in a forest in France. His father said to him, “If we keep going in a straight line we’ll get out of here.” He was correct, a bit of wisdom Haig turned to during his depression when he focused on moving forward: “It is important to remember the bottom of the valley never has the clearest view. And that sometimes all you need to do in order to rise up again is to keep moving forward.” Many aphorisms sound right, if hardly groundbreaking—e.g., a quick route to happiness is making someone else happy; “No is a good word. It keeps you sane. In an age of overload, no is really yes. It is yes to having space you need to live”; “External events are neutral. They only gain positive or negative value the moment they enter our mind.” Haig’s fans may enjoy this one, but others should take a pass.

A handful of pearls amid a pile of empty oyster shells.

Pub Date: July 6, 2021

ISBN: 978-0-14-313666-8

Page Count: 272

Publisher: Penguin Life

Review Posted Online: May 19, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2021

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A welcome reference, entertaining and information-packed, for any outdoors-inclined reader.

THE MEATEATER GUIDE TO WILDERNESS SKILLS AND SURVIVAL

The bad news: On any given outdoor expedition, you are your own worst enemy. The good news: If you are prepared, which this book helps you achieve, you might just live through it.

As MeatEater host and experienced outdoorsman Rinella notes, there are countless dangers attendant in going into mountains, woods, or deserts; he quotes journalist Wes Siler: “People have always managed to find stupid ways to die.” Avoiding stupid mistakes is the overarching point of Rinella’s latest book, full of provocative and helpful advice. One stupid way to die is not to have the proper equipment. There’s a complication built into the question, given that when humping gear into the outdoors, weight is always an issue. The author’s answer? “Build your gear list by prioritizing safety.” That entails having some means of communication, water, food, and shelter foremost and then adding on “extra shit.” As to that, he notes gravely, “a National Park Service geologist recently estimated that as much as 215,000 pounds of feces has been tossed haphazardly into crevasses along the climbing route on Denali National Park’s Kahiltna Glacier, where climbers melt snow for drinking water.” Ingesting fecal matter is a quick route to sickness, and Rinella adds, there are plenty of outdoorspeople who have no idea of how to keep their bodily wastes from ruining the scenery or poisoning the water supply. Throughout, the author provides precise information about wilderness first aid, ranging from irrigating wounds to applying arterial pressure to keeping someone experiencing a heart attack (a common event outdoors, given that so many people overexert without previous conditioning) alive. Some takeaways: Keep your crotch dry, don’t pitch a tent under a dead tree limb, walk side-hill across mountains, and “do not enter a marsh or swamp in flip-flops, and think twice before entering in strap-on sandals such as Tevas or Chacos.”

A welcome reference, entertaining and information-packed, for any outdoors-inclined reader.

Pub Date: Dec. 1, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-593-12969-2

Page Count: 464

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: Oct. 7, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2020

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