A TREASURY OF TURKISH FOLKTALES FOR CHILDREN by Barbara K.--Adapt. Walker

A TREASURY OF TURKISH FOLKTALES FOR CHILDREN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A lively, well-written collection of 34 tales. Interspersed with Turkish riddles, ancient and modern, each story is framed with traditionally Turkish openings (""Once there was and twice there wasn't, when the flea was a porter and the camel a barber"") and closings (""Three apples fell from the sky, one for the teller of this tale, one for the listener, and the third for the one who asks 'Where is mine? Where is mine?'""). Walker's text is full of action and color, with strong plots and a sense of momentum. Many of the stories are variants of more familiar Western tales: ""Just Say Hic"" is a version of the Appalachian ""Soap Soap Soap""; ""Stargazer to the Sultan"" echoes the Puerto Rican ""Juan Bubo and the Necklace""; and ""The Magpie and the Milk"" is similar to ""One Fine Day."" Intelligence and luck defeating wealth and power is a recurring theme. There are several tales about small creatures with great egos who imagine mighty feats, as well as small creatures with great wit who accomplish them. Walker's previous collections (Once There Was and Twice There Wasn't and Watermelons, Walnuts and the Wisdom of Allah, both unfortunately o.p.) were somewhat more accessible to the independent reader; still, this is suitable for all ages if told or read aloud, and not only fills a need for folk-tale collections--but fills it very well. Pronunciation guide; glossary; introduction by the authors.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1988
Page count: 155pp
Publisher: Linnet/Shoe String