WHY COULDN'T I BE AN ONLY KID LIKE YOU, WIGGER by Barbara Shook Hazen

WHY COULDN'T I BE AN ONLY KID LIKE YOU, WIGGER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Wigger you've really got it made. You never had to stand in line just to go to the john. Or wear somebody else's crummy clothes."" And so in the familiar assuasive vein Hazen has Wigger's friend run through all the drawbacks to large family living before she comes back with Wigger's answer to why he's ""always over here when you've got everything at your place"": ""I don't know. Sometimes it gets lonely being an only kid."" The dialogue is natural and the black and white pictures empathic, with Wigger's view of his own home looking sterile and lonely whereas the other household's mess and confusion are infused with a comfortable warmth. Which is fine for the intended patient but why couldn't an only kid have a good deal too? And if attitude shaping is the name of the game, are six-child families what we really want to push?

Pub Date: Oct. 22nd, 1975
Page count: 32pp
Publisher: Atheneum