TRUTH IS STRANGER THAN FISHIN' by Beatrice Cook

TRUTH IS STRANGER THAN FISHIN'

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KIRKUS REVIEW

An irresistible come-hither for the rod and reel boys, this re-creation of the evolution of tackle, origins of gear -- and piscatorial philosophy. This feminine, angler (ready or not) has quarried out and collected a fisherman's delight -- from 3,000 B.C. (that is Imhotep, his barbed hook and rod -- and his ever-loving wife in Egypt) up to Izaak Walton, and produced bits and pieces from their writings (or pictographs) to line up the evolution of sport fishing tackle and to interpolate her own version of what might have occurred (or what SHOULD have). The Prioress Juliana of the 15th century (she wrote A Treatyse On Fysshynnge With An Angle has her problems in making her own rigs; Confucius learns the ways of cormorants and watches a romance; Aristotle on the island of Lesbos indoctrinates his master, Plato -- and gets a lesson from his wife; while Walton suffers his second wife's sharp tongue -- and sees his book printed -- with an error that is more than grave. This goes to the source for the legacy of modern descendants in more than alluring prose positives.

Publisher: Morrow