POISONED HONEY

A STORY OF MARY MAGDALENE

In this follow-up to her 2007 novel, Salome, Gormley gives readers the story of Mary Magdalene. Asserting in an author’s note that there’s no biblical evidence that Mary was a prostitute, the author presents her instead as a bright, imaginative child forced into marriage with an elderly man whose family despises her. Mary takes refuge in fantasies of another world, the demonic denizens of which become increasingly real, threatening to consume her. In a subplot, tax collector Matthew tries to ignore the injustices his Roman superiors demand he mete out. The lives of both change when an itinerant healer, Yeshua (Jesus), a charismatic and engaging character, casts out Mary’s demons and shows Matthew a different way to live. The setting is vivid, the characters realistic and convincing, the plot exciting. While readers are left to decide whether Mary suffers from demonic possession or mental illness, Yeshua’s miraculous gifts are presented as fact. Christian readers are well served here, but in today’s religiously diverse society, non-Christians may feel uncomfortable with the doctrine that underlies the story. (Historical fantasy. 12 & up)

Pub Date: March 9, 2010

ISBN: 978-0-375-85207-7

Page Count: 272

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: Jan. 8, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 15, 2010

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Engrossing, contemplative, and as heart-wrenching as the title promises.

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THEY BOTH DIE AT THE END

What would you do with one day left to live?

In an alternate present, a company named Death-Cast calls Deckers—people who will die within the coming day—to inform them of their impending deaths, though not how they will happen. The End Day call comes for two teenagers living in New York City: Puerto Rican Mateo and bisexual Cuban-American foster kid Rufus. Rufus needs company after a violent act puts cops on his tail and lands his friends in jail; Mateo wants someone to push him past his comfort zone after a lifetime of playing it safe. The two meet through Last Friend, an app that connects lonely Deckers (one of many ways in which Death-Cast influences social media). Mateo and Rufus set out to seize the day together in their final hours, during which their deepening friendship blossoms into something more. Present-tense chapters, short and time-stamped, primarily feature the protagonists’ distinctive first-person narrations. Fleeting third-person chapters give windows into the lives of other characters they encounter, underscoring how even a tiny action can change the course of someone else’s life. It’s another standout from Silvera (History Is All You Left Me, 2017, etc.), who here grapples gracefully with heavy questions about death and the meaning of a life well-lived.

Engrossing, contemplative, and as heart-wrenching as the title promises. (Speculative fiction. 13-adult).

Pub Date: Sept. 5, 2017

ISBN: 978-0-06-245779-0

Page Count: 384

Publisher: HarperTeen

Review Posted Online: June 5, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2017

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THE BOY IN THE STRIPED PAJAMAS

After Hitler appoints Bruno’s father commandant of Auschwitz, Bruno (nine) is unhappy with his new surroundings compared to the luxury of his home in Berlin. The literal-minded Bruno, with amazingly little political and social awareness, never gains comprehension of the prisoners (all in “striped pajamas”) or the malignant nature of the death camp. He overcomes loneliness and isolation only when he discovers another boy, Shmuel, on the other side of the camp’s fence. For months, the two meet, becoming secret best friends even though they can never play together. Although Bruno’s family corrects him, he childishly calls the camp “Out-With” and the Fuhrer “Fury.” As a literary device, it could be said to be credibly rooted in Bruno’s consistent, guileless characterization, though it’s difficult to believe in reality. The tragic story’s point of view is unique: the corrosive effect of brutality on Nazi family life as seen through the eyes of a naïf. Some will believe that the fable form, in which the illogical may serve the objective of moral instruction, succeeds in Boyle’s narrative; others will believe it was the wrong choice. Certain to provoke controversy and difficult to see as a book for children, who could easily miss the painful point. (Fiction. 12-14)

Pub Date: Sept. 12, 2006

ISBN: 0-385-75106-0

Page Count: 224

Publisher: David Fickling/Random

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 2006

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