GARDENING WITHOUT POISONS by Beatrice Trum Hunter

GARDENING WITHOUT POISONS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A forward looking approach to gardening that seems to be a direct response or compliment to Rachel Carson's thesis in Silent Spring, this exposits the present and explores the future possibilities in dealing with pests with only minimal resource to poisonous sprays. Mrs. Hunter seeks an integrated control of insects, birds and animals, and blights through biological means supported by prudent use of chemicals. She discusses the mixing of crops for ecological benefit; the introduction of predators (such as the lady beetle) to combat their pest-prey; the building up of soil; the control of weeds (which have many beneficial characteristics); the use of insect diseases in control; the breeding of plants for resistance. The prospect of applying radiation, sound waves, control through atmosphere or disturbing the body chemistry are among those she posits for future development. For those shaken by the Carson book, here is a vanguard application.

Pub Date: April 21st, 1964
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin