HOW SAFE IS FOOD IN YOUR KITCHEN? by Beatrice Trum Hunter

HOW SAFE IS FOOD IN YOUR KITCHEN?

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The author of The Great Nutrition Robbery (1978) and other such, has looked over the safety record of common kitchen items and compiled a surprising number of documented or probable health hazards. Decals on earthenware and glasses, for example, often contain high degrees of lead, which can migrate into food. A large percentage of microwave ovens have leakage problems. Wood cutting boards, if not properly cleaned, may harbor pathogenic organisms from meat. The plastic in cooking bags is not, as originally claimed, inert; parchment sheet (from Vita-Wrap) is a safe alternative. There are, of course, plenty of cooking devices and kitchen supplies that come more highly recommended--ironware, good quality enamelware, an Everpure water filter--and many others, such as resin-coated cook-ware, that merit conditional approval. But many are iffy and a few (food-smoking chambers and charcoal grills) should be avoided altogether. Soft spots in the fruits of technology, usefully mapped out.

Pub Date: March 1st, 1981
Publisher: Scribners