FRATERNITY VILLAGE by Ben Ames Williams

FRATERNITY VILLAGE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This is a made to request book, the result of years of queries as to where the Fraternity Village short stories could be found in book form. Some of these stories date book almost thirty years; some are fairly recent; most of them have appeared in periodicals with the S.E.P. as the chief source. On the reputation built with these stories, Ben Ames Williams was, for years, considered one of the chief spokesmen for the State of Maine, and rereading them intensifies this impression. His Fraternity Village lives for his readers; the storekeeper, with his earnest assistant, the doctor, the neighboring farmers -- and chief in our hearts, Chet McAusland, who introduced Ben Ames Williams to the woods and marshes and streams of his beloved countryside. Some of the stories are action stories, but most of them are homespun character stories- and all of them have that quality of reality, from the sense of authenticity of sights and sounds and feel of the village to the true story character in the things that happened, and the way the neighbors talked about them over Will Bissell's pot-bellied stove. A collection of stories that will appeal to those who knew them as they came along- and to men who like to swap yarns of dogs and guns and country folk. But not a book for the relatively new Ben Ames Williams' market of Leave Her to Heaven and Strange Woman.

Pub Date: July 12th, 1949
Publisher: Houghton, Mifflin