WHITE HOUSE SERMONS by Ben -- Ed. Hibbs

WHITE HOUSE SERMONS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

In January, 1969, Richard Nixon inaugurated the Sunday morning White House services to which he has invited guest preachers from a fairly wide geographical range and a more discreet selection of theological orientations. To some the services are an ominous rumbling under the First Amendment; others consider this to be a refreshing assumption of moral leadership: in any case, this is a revealing and not uninteresting collection of sermons (with opening and closing prayers). In general the tone is subdued evangelicanism, the method homiletic and Scripture illustrated. There are a handful of familiar names (Norman Vincent Peale, Cardinal Cooke, and of course Billy Graham) sharing billing with guests like Dr. Charles Malik, former President of the Geneva Assembly of the U.N., who offered a graceful exhortation to peace, and Dr. Paul Smith of Whittier College whose sermon is the most intellectually muscular and certainly the most rewarding. An extra bonus are three or four rather funny jokes and anecdotes. With an introduction by the President, a sampling of spiritual tides in high places.

Pub Date: May 17th, 1972
Publisher: Harper & Row