BLACK TRIUMVIRATE: A Novel of Haiti by Benjamin H. Levin

BLACK TRIUMVIRATE: A Novel of Haiti

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This bloody (and awful) novel borrows (unintentionally?) its title from the study of these three (Toussaint L'Ouverture, Dessalines, and Henri Christophe) which appeared in 1957 and recreates, if you could call it that, the freedom-for-the-people they staged in Haiti at the beginning of the 19th century. Following scene after engorged scene, Dessalines eventually becomes the Emperor-despot only to be killed, to be succeeded by Christophe whose almost as short-lived reign is one of European imitative extravagance and pompousness. Without taking a strict headcount, there are a minimum of three ""woolly"" ones with ""full-mouthed,"" ""thick"" and even ""flamingo"" lips while everyone sweats a great deal. . . .

Pub Date: March 1st, 1972
Publisher: Citadel -- dist. by Lyle Stuart