THE INVADERS OF ROME by Bern Keating

THE INVADERS OF ROME

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Behind the simple sentence in most juvenile histories placing the Fall of Rome in the year 476 lies a hundred years of plots and counterplots, murder and massacre -- a period that makes the so-called Dark Ages seem halcyon by comparison. In this political and military history, the author has endeavored, with some success, to follow the wandering tribes as they interact with each other and with the remnant of power that is Rome. Each leader has his moment of glory -- or infamy -- before he is overthrown. The initiative passes from Fritigern the Visigoth, to Theodosius the Eastern Roman Emperor, to Radagaisus the Ostroth, to Alaric the Visigoth, to Stillicho the Western Roman general, back to Alaric and his sack of Rome in 410. By this time, in every part of the Empire, the poor and middle class, exploited by the Romans, welcomed the invaders. The remaining years were an orgy of bloodshed -- Romans and Huns against Franks, Romans against Huns, Franks against Franks, Vandals triumphant everywhere -- until the second Sack of Rome and the final demise of the Empire shortly thereafter. A straightforward account of men and events, unadorned except for some unfortunate modern colloquialisms. Overwhelming except for the hardy reader.

Pub Date: Sept. 29th, 1966
Publisher: Putnam