A LAYMAN'S GUIDE TO NAVAL STRATEGY by Bernard Brodie

A LAYMAN'S GUIDE TO NAVAL STRATEGY

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

A stodgy -- and not too accurate -- title for an important book, which should help clarify the confused thinking on the subject of the place the navy plays in the war. Not only does he succeed in clearing the air of the rubbish talked of naval obsolescence, but here gives an intelligible interpretation of the naval campaigns to date. The book is sound, clear, concise; it gets back to solid realities. Brodie, author of Sea Power in the Machine Age, is no reactionary; he is quick to perceive and evaluate the overwhelming importance of new weapons, but feels that they leave underlying principles unchanged and that in the last analysis men win the wars with machines, not vice versa. Experts may pick some flaws in details, as for instance some inaccuracies in Japanese naval history, but basically -- for the average reader -- it is a dependable and interesting job.

Pub Date: Sept. 21st, 1942
Publisher: Princeton