THE RISE OF PROTESTANT MONASTICISM by

THE RISE OF PROTESTANT MONASTICISM

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Ecumenical indeed is the recent manifestation on the publishing scene of Catholic authors writing about Protestant subjects -- sympathetically and with understanding. This book which treats of Protestant religious communities is an example. The rediscovery of monastic and religious community life by Protestants which repudiates the attitudes of sixteenth century reformers is seen by Father Biot as a clear way for Protestant and Catholic communication on at least one point. The author does not include Anglican religious groups in his discussion. Content to keep the presentation objective and avoiding a ""Catholic view"", Father Biot traces the consequences of the Reformers' attitudes; particularly those of Luther, Calvin, Zwingll, Melancthon, and others, but allows the facts to speak for themselves. The reader learns of monastic survivals despite the reformers. In stabing the facts which are at variance with the reformers' attitudes, he also demonstrates the doctrinal justification in Protestant survivals, particularly in such new developments as the Brothers of Taize. A book of limited interest to be sure, it is nevertheless an honest contribution to the promotion of better understanding of the subject by supplying an undiluted deposit of what the Reformers said, what happened and why, as well as the replies of Catholic theologians.

Pub Date: Nov. 1st, 1963
Publisher: Helicon