EMBATTLED WITNESS: Memories of a Time of War by Bernard Haring

EMBATTLED WITNESS: Memories of a Time of War

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Bernard Hating, renowned philosopher of ethics, was a young priest at the time of WW II, conscripted into the German army as a medic. In this capacity he was forbidden to act as a priest and decided to ignore the prohibition. It is this situation and the author's qualities as a good man who thinks that give this book of WW II anecdote and reflection its high degree of interest and stimulus. His work as a medic in a time of universal slaughter and privation was half his role and it reinforced the other half--provision via rite, instruction, and mutual support for the Christian nurture of the inner man. The author discovered that when he insisted on this role, he found a response among his fellow soldiers, German officers, and Russian civilians. Though the evils of Nazism are recognized in the specifics of the story, the thrust of the book is the evocation across national and denominational lines of the community of faith and caring in the realities of service and worship. The pretentious title is out of character with the down-to-earth tone of the book.

Pub Date: Oct. 25th, 1976
Publisher: Seabury