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DEATH IN DIYARBAKIR by Bernard M. Brodsky

DEATH IN DIYARBAKIR

By Bernard M. Brodsky

Pub Date: July 3rd, 2012
ISBN: 978-1432794071
Publisher: Outskirts Press Inc.

A Turkish army general and a Kurdish lawyer try to overcome their instinctive distrust of one another and work together—while keeping their unexpected romantic feelings from getting in the way—in order to solve a political mystery.

Brodsky’s debut thriller is set in the tense world of modern-day Turkey. Turks and Kurds distrust each other at best; at worst, they hunt each other down, with violent repression on one side and insurgent terrorism on the other. When a prominent Kurdish doctor and his family disappear one night under mysterious circumstances, Kurdish lawyer Emine Sesen suspects the Turkish special forces of being behind the disappearances. Emine has reasons to be suspicious, given how Turkish police once brutally treated her after arresting her on fabricated charges. Later, members of the Turkish special forces stop her on the street, and she suspects them of politically motivated harassment. But Emine finds an unlikely ally in Turkish general Arslan Buyukdag. Both the general and the lawyer come from prominent families with long histories in Turkish–Kurdish conflicts. When they end up working together to solve the mystery of what happened to the doctor and his family, tensions flare. Soon, however, they come to trust each other and even to develop romantic feelings. Their pursuit of truth keeps them in constant danger and leads them into deepening mystery and intrigue, while the novel offers readers a glimpse of a region less frequently in the news than some of its neighbors. Fans of geopolitical thrillers will find plenty of engaging material, and the local color adds believable context. The plotting is occasionally slow for a thriller, and some readers may find the romantic storyline predictable and realistically improbable. Nonetheless, fans of the genre will be taken by the intrigue.

An exciting novel that delves into the tensions of modern Turkey and the human heart.