THE WORLD OF ESPIONAGE by Bernard Newman

THE WORLD OF ESPIONAGE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

In the spate of spy books now appearing, veteran investigator-lecturer-writer (this is his 110th book) Bernard Newman's book has the distinction of reversing certain long-standing judgments. He also selects some classic and modern cases from which ""salient lessons can be learned"" or to which he can add new material. He ranges from Napoleon's master-spy Shulmeister and the first spy-master, Stieber, to many more familiar present day names: Captain Gary Powers and the U-2 incident, seen as a convenience for Khrushchev-to sabotage the Summit conference; to Sorge and Nunn May and Fuchs and Hiss; to the Portland ring in England, and less known, Mrs. O'Grady, the only woman sentenced to death in England during WW I as a spy- although her activities were just a ""joke"". Fictions exposed include Mata Hari- the victim of a mis- of justice, not a courtesan spy, and Burgess and Maclean, not spies but escaping prosecution on homosexual charges. In Newman's extensive dossier there are the tattletale trifles which betray- a haircut, or a bicycle ridden on the wrong side of the road; Russian techniques today; spy schools; spies in high places; women spies- unreliable. If truth is stranger than-- Newman's straightforward but unexciting writing does little to help it along, and if the ordinary man makes the best spy, he tries to keep him that way in the interests of authenticity.

Pub Date: Feb. 14th, 1963
Publisher: British Book Center