ANNA'S SILENT WORLD by Bernard Weft

ANNA'S SILENT WORLD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Wolf, who introduced us to a blind girl in Connie's New Eyes (1976), turns here to the much younger Anna, who was born deaf. A first grader at a regular school, Anna studies speech and lip reading at the New York League for the Hard of Hearing and ballet at a private studio where she is able to sense and keep time with the rhythm of the music. Wolf shows her at all her lessons (and, without comment, shows her alone on a swing at recess), and at home on Saturday Anna's mother shows friend Margaret how the body aids she wears strapped to her chest help to amplify the little sound she can hear. Throughout, Anna's handicap is naturally accepted, but not as a limitation--the special measures it calls for are taken equally for granted, and we leave Anna playing her new Christmas recorder. As usual Wolf treats reader and subject with dignity and honesty, and (incidentally) this is a far more genuine encounter than Peterson's I Have a Sister-My Sister Is Deaf (p. 348, J-84).

Pub Date: April 15th, 1977
Publisher: Lippincott