THE TREASURE OF SUTTON HOO by Bernice Grohskopf

THE TREASURE OF SUTTON HOO

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KIRKUS REVIEW

An attractively arranged and styled summary of the 1939 excavation at Sutton Hoo in Suffolk, England, which uncovered an early 7th century ship burial. Miss Grohskopf reviews the events leading to the discovery, the manner of excavation, descriptions of the articles found. The Sutton Hoo treasure, pre-dating Bede, is really the ""only document"" extant of the early Anglo-Saxon period when Christianity was just beginning to be adopted, and when -- as attested by the findings -- the ""heathen Germanic tribes"" of fifth century invasions had reached some degree of sophistication. The author discusses the speculation as to the identity of an ancient king buried at Sutton Hoo (Redwald, an East Anglian king, whom Bede had mentioned as having ""received Christian Baptism in Kent, but to no good purpose."") That Britain was at the time hardly isolated was suggested by the uncovering of objects identified as having been made in Sweden some time before the date of the burial. With careful background sketches from scholarly assessments of life in 7th century Britain and opportunely placed selections from Beowulf, this is an unusally competent and judiciously balanced report on a momentous dig.

Pub Date: Feb. 24th, 1969
Publisher: Atheneum