OUR ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE by Bernice Richmond
Kirkus Star

OUR ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The readers who ""discovered"" Bernice Richmond's Winter Harbor (Holt-'43) wont have forgotten that delightful experience, and will welcome this sequel. And for those who didn't read the earlier book, this stands on its own, with its subtle humor, its zest for a way of life, its sensitive appreciation. The Richmond had left the tensions of New York behind them when they took up summer residence in a lighthouse near Winter Harbor, Maine. Now infected with the island peace, they have found a way to make their island suitable the year round; they've made friends with the villagers, coped with sea and weather, and the ordinary trials and tribulations of extraordinary housekeeping. There are the two tiger cats, 11-year old John and bumpkin Willie, there is Cousin Fenetta, whipping up raspberry tarts and johnnyoake, to supplement the load of delicacies she brought for her annual visit. There are the lobster men and their families, Cranny and Auntie with their folksy kindnesses, the trips to other islands, with quaint solid names for driftwood and clam bakes. There's the garden where Bunny rivalled the garden catalogues. There are Reg's hot buttered rums -- and his reconverted hen house. Ordinary day-by-day recounting, spiced with contagious personality, whimsy, humor and charm. This for the The Islanders and Happy the Land market, well salted.

Pub Date: May 5th, 1947
Publisher: Random House