GRANDMA CALLED IT CARNAL by Bertha Damon
Kirkus Star

GRANDMA CALLED IT CARNAL

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The story of a New England childhood, and it has the qualities that the Parmenter book (see page 342) lacks, of humor and pathos and an accent on the spiritual attempt to overcome the material sides of life. The author and her sister were brought up by a grandmother who was a stoic and a disciple of Thoreau. She tried to subdue her senses, to oppose the wiles of modern living, but her gardening, and the flavor of simple meals, and joy in long walks were obstacles in her way. Against this somewhat bleak background the author tells of the pleasures they could not share, of the tragedy of the pets they could not have, the embarrassment of rural life, the life in North Stonefield, Connecticut, under the rod of her grandmother's strangeness of living. Interesting, often entertaining, with something of the Life With Father flavor. A good bet.

Pub Date: Nov. 3rd, 1938
Publisher: Simon & Schuster