HUNGARIAN RHAPSODY by Bertita Harding

HUNGARIAN RHAPSODY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This isn't tops for Bertita Harding, but she has a faculty for making the grade, even with rather light weight material. She has tapped a new vein in this biography, and the story of her finding the prototype of her story is in itself romantic. It is the story of her godmother, with whom contact had been lost for the greater part of her life. She was Camille Feher de Vernet, a well born Slovak girl, who broke with family tradition to go on the stage, became the darling of light opera, abandoned her career to care for her half-brother, came to America, and -- descending lower and lower in the scale -- was actually on relief when Bertita Harding learned of her existence and whereabouts. This is her story, sentimentalized a bit, but lovingly portrayed, with its background of Hungarian life, a picture of loyalty and courage in the face of mounting poverty. Camille, though her name would not carry weight alone, is a personality in her own right. Publisher backing, with the usual advertising, promotion and sales aids.

Pub Date: Sept. 16th, 1940
Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill