INDIANS, PRIVATEERS AND HIGH SOCIETY by Bertram Lippincott

INDIANS, PRIVATEERS AND HIGH SOCIETY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This book makes obeisance to the history of the State of Rhode Island, often at the expense of the reputation of the State of Massachusetts. Lippincott's every reference to disputes between the sister colonies, and later the neighboring states, seeks to put the one in the right and the other invariably in the wrong. Every act of religious intolerance, every malfeasance of public office of the early days, Lippincott represents as a trait of Massachusetts character, while Rhode Island he idealizes as the stronghold of civil liberties and the bulwark of free enterprise. Anne Hutchinson, Gilbert Stuart, Ida Lewis the intrepid lighthousekeeper, Ward McAllister, originator of the social Four Hundred, and other notables are memorialized here as part of a continuing tradition that the smallest state shall not supply the fewest colorful characters to the nation's roster of fame. The book's style is highly idiomatic, even slangy. Little is said about the contemporary period (beyond some haughty observations concerning the 1960 Newport Jazz Festival riots). The overall effect is of gossip, rather than serious history.

Publisher: Lippincott