BESTSELLERS

THE BONE CLOCKS by David Mitchell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 2, 2014
If Thatcher's 1984 is bleak, then get a load of what awaits us in 2030. Speculative, lyrical and unrelentingly dark—trademark Mitchell, in other words. Read full book review >
RUMBLE by Ellen Hopkins

VERDICT: BORROW IT
Released: Aug. 26, 2014
Readers devour Hopkins regardless, but this is strong and worthy. (Verse fiction. 14-18)Read full book review >

THE RULE OF THOUGHTS by James Dashner
Released: Aug. 26, 2014
An excellent franchise entry that proves planned series can be just as enjoyable as one-offs. (Science fiction. 12-16)Read full book review >
BROWN GIRL DREAMING by Jacqueline Woodson
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Aug. 28, 2014
For every dreaming girl (and boy) with a pencil in hand (or keyboard) and a story to share. (Memoir/poetry. 8-12)Read full book review >
I AM MALALA by Malala Yousafzai
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Aug. 19, 2014
Though Yousafzai's memoir never transcends her story, that story is a powerful and inspiring one; supplemented by contextualizing information, it should pack quite a wallop. (glossary) (Memoir. 10-14)Read full book review >

THE FOURTEENTH GOLDFISH by Jennifer L. Holm
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Aug. 26, 2014
Appealing and thought-provoking, with an ending that suggests endless possibilities. (Science fiction. 10-14)Read full book review >
LADYBUG GIRL AND THE DRESS-UP DILEMMA by Jacky Davis
by Jacky Davis, illustrated by David Soman

VERDICT: BORROW IT
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Aug. 19, 2014
Readers and their parents will appreciate how Lulu works through her dilemma on her own. Not only is this an entertaining story, but it's also a good conversation starter about being true to oneself. (Picture book. 4-7)Read full book review >
QUEST by Aaron Becker
Kirkus Star
by Aaron Becker, illustrated by Aaron Becker

VERDICT: BUY IT
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Aug. 26, 2014
Breathtaking in scope, consider this a wordless testament to the power of not just imagination, but art itself; picture books rarely feel this epic. (Picture book. 4-8)Read full book review >
HEROES ARE MY WEAKNESS by Susan Elizabeth Phillips
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 26, 2014
Heart-wrenching and uplifting, with witty dialogue, emotional depth, and details that give substance and texture to an already entertaining, engrossing story. Read full book review >
THE LONG WAY HOME by Louise Penny
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 26, 2014
Gamache's 10th outing (How the Light Gets In, 2013, etc.) culminates in one breathless encounter, and readers may feel they weren't prepared for this story to end. The residents of Three Pines will be back, no doubt, as they'll have new wounds to mend.Read full book review >
FOUR by Veronica Roth

VERDICT: SKIP IT
ROMANCE
Released: July 8, 2014
For fans only; but their number is legion. (Dystopian romance. 12 & up)Read full book review >
FRANK EINSTEIN AND THE ANTIMATTER MOTOR by Jon Scieszka
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Aug. 26, 2014
Less wacky (and more instructive) than Scieszka's Spaceheadz series—but just as much fun. (Science fiction/humor. 8-12)Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >