BESTSELLERS

THE BOOK WITH NO PICTURES by B.J. Novak
Released: Sept. 30, 2014
A riotously fresh take on breaking the fourth wall. (Picture book. 3-8)Read full book review >
REBEL YELL by S.C. Gwynne
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 21, 2014
A satisfying biography though less exhaustive in its approach than Robert Krick's Conquering the Valley (1996) and somewhat less fluent than James Robertson's Stonewall Jackson: The Man, the Soldier, the Legend (1997). Read full book review >

THE SENSE OF STYLE by Steven Pinker
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Sept. 30, 2014
Fatter and more complex than Strunk and White, and some of the more technical arguments may make this a tough sell on the first-year comp front. Still, Pinker's vade mecum is a worthy addition to any writer's library. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 30, 2014
Of a piece with the work of Tracy Kidder, Henry Petroski and other popular explainers of technology and science—geeky without being overly so and literate throughout. Read full book review >
NOT THAT KIND OF GIRL by Lena Dunham
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 30, 2014
Dunham shows flashes of the humor and sharp eye that make Girls so compelling, but the pleasure of watching the TV show doesn't translate to the page. Read full book review >

STATION ELEVEN by Emily St. John Mandel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 9, 2014
Mandel's solid writing and magnetic narrative make for a strong combination in what should be a breakout novel. Read full book review >
A SUDDEN LIGHT by Garth Stein

VERDICT: SKIP IT
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 30, 2014
A repetitive, poorly conceived work of pulp fiction. Frankly, we're stumped. Read full book review >
THE LOST KEY by Catherine Coulter
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 30, 2014
A thriller packed with nonstop action, real-life name-dropping and enough cutting-edge science to make you wonder how much of it could be true. Read full book review >
AFTERWORLDS by Scott Westerfeld

VERDICT: BUY IT
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 23, 2014
Watching Darcy's story play off Darcy's novel will fascinate readers as well as writers. (Fiction. 14 & up)Read full book review >
SKINK—NO SURRENDER by Carl Hiaasen

VERDICT: BORROW IT
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 23, 2014
Hiaasen's fierce love for the wilds of Florida, his fundamental commitment to decency and his penchant for the bizarre are all on full display in this, a read as agreeable as his hero is. (Fiction. 10-15)Read full book review >
THE CONTRACT by Derek Jeter
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 23, 2014
Plenty of baseball action, but the paint-by-numbers plot is just a vehicle for equally standard-issue advice. (foundation ad and curriculum guide, not seen). (Fiction. 7-9)Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 23, 2014
An urgent report on the state of American aspirations and a haunting dispatch from forsaken streets. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >